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Me, again.If someone is fully mute, can they still make a hissing noise? Or voice those parts of a letter sound that are not made in the throat (if they exist)?Definite responses greatly appreciated.
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Is there something wrong with, say, her tongue or vocal chords?...If she has a problem with her tongue she could be understood faguely and yes and no is entirely possible to be produced as are grunts and hisses. Anyother causes I"m unsure of.
Yes, hissing could happen.Hissing isn"t a sound produced so much by the vocal cords, in all cases, but can also happen by air being blown through clenched teeth. Much like a sigh, or whistling, do not involve the vocal cords, but rather forcing air through the mouth.As for grunting, I"m pretty sure that Helen Keller did a lot of grunting. I know many deaf people that do grunt, hiss and make other sorts of vocalizations. Of course, those are deaf people. I"m not sure I"ve ever met an actual mute person.Hope that helps.Rabe...
Actually, Helen Keller was taught to speak--and gave lectures from time to time. Her problem wasn"t lack of vocal cords, it was inability to hear.
Actually, Helen Keller was taught to speak--and gave lectures from time to time. Her problem wasn"t lack of vocal cords, it was inability to hear.

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I"d have thought the same thing, if I hadn"t known beforehand. I"ve just been a big biography freak since I was in second grade!
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Oh, THAT"S why your asking. I think that"s a whole different question.As to how "well-adjusted" she can be, that"s a whole different story. Here"s the question, is she in a community where she has support of others like herself? Those who may be Deaf or mute as well?My brother is hearing impaired and has a very thick speech impediment because of it. We grew up in a town that didn"t have much of a Deaf/mute community at the time so he got stuck into "special ed" classes with kids who had developmental, behavioral and other real problems. It didn"t help him at all. Add to the mix a midwestern father who was dead set that his child would be "normal" and refused to allow him the use of sign language, and you have a guy who"s not at *all* well adjusted.A lot of it isn"t his problem. People hear him talk and automatically assume he"s retarded. People I"ve known for years still slip up and call him my "retarded brother". That"s not the problem at all, it"s because he"s hearing impaired. Then you have the frustration he feels from trying to make himself understood to a world at large that usually disregards his attempts and makes no attempts on their own to understand him and you got a guy with a lot of built-in frustration. Even when he does use sign language (very rarely - and because of the secretive way he was taught, he has problems when hearing folk, like myself, use sign language) people who don"t know sign language don"t even make the attempt to try to deal with him effectively, because it"s taking away their precious time and making them think beyond themselves.So, while most people are going to look at a story wherein a mute child has a loving home life and *everyone* just thinks that he/she is just so darling, and isn"t it precious the way they learned to write so early in life? But there"s a large part of the population who are going to know different from their own dealings with Deaf/mute family members who are going to cry foul on it. So there"s still a lot more to think about with a well-adjusted person than if they can grunt or not.Sorry for getting on the soapbox about it though. I certainly hope that you feel free to contact me if you have further questions. I"ll try to answer to the best of my experience. Or if you keep posting your questions here.(BTW...when a Deaf/mute child is raised in a community where there are others in their particular subculture, they do seem to grow up more well-adjusted socially. However that doesn"t mean the end of problems for them. One perk? In our town, my brother was recently summoned for jury duty. He had two ways to get out of the jury pool right away. His impairment would provide too much of a hardship on the court to accommodate AND I was on the witness list! He was actually happy that he had a "normal" excuse for getting out of it for a change!)Rabe...
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I"ve known mute people who are mute because they are either totally deaf (from birth) and one from a vocal cord injury. Both could make some kind of hissing/grunting sound. Both attended the Fremont School for the Deaf. (I interviewed them for a story I once wrote)